on sale now at amazon

on sale now at amazon
"I don't like this book because it don't got know pictures" Chief Rhorerer

“It’s becoming a disturbingly familiar scene in America - mentally unstable cops”

“It’s becoming a disturbingly familiar scene in America - mentally unstable cops”
“It’s becoming a disturbingly familiar scene in America - mentally unstable cops”

Meet FCPD Intelligence Detective, See Fairfax One


Residents can get a behind-the-scenes glimpse of the Fairfax County Police Department’s Intelligence section June 1. The meeting will take place at the Fairfax County heliport on 666 West Ox Road, so anyone who attends will have an opportunity to see the helicopter, Fairfax One, up close.

Go and look at it. After all you paid for it and their using it to spy on you without a warrant so go see what you paid.


The Sully District CAC will also host a speaker in June, at the Sully District Governmental Center, 4900 Stonecroft Boulevard, Chantilly, June 9 at 9:30 p.m. Detectives will describe the investigation into the extensive vandalism at the Ahmadiyya Muslim Community’s Mubarak Mosque two years ago.

As a public courtesy they will then  beat, gag and arrest several Muslims and later accuse them of having a gun.

Bring the kids!






Cops and the women they abuse: Enoch Clark is his name

Cops and the women they abuse: Enoch Clark is his name

Cops and the women they abuse: Frank Messina is his name

Cops and the women they abuse: Frank Messina is his name

Cops and the women they abuse: Serve n' protect

Cops and the women they abuse: Serve n' protect

Magic powers for those kids in high school you tried to avoid



Proving that more murders smoke dope?



I'm on drugs?



You wanna be start'n somethin?


The epidemic of mentally unstable cops in America: And this cop got away with it too....nothing happe...

The epidemic of mentally unstable cops in America: And this cop got away with it too....nothing happe...

The epidemic of mentally unstable cops in America: And this cop got away with it too....nothing happe...

The epidemic of mentally unstable cops in America: And this cop got away with it too....nothing happe...

The epidemic of mentally unstable cops in America: Durham city council to discuss excessive force com...

The epidemic of mentally unstable cops in America: Durham city council to discuss excessive force com...: By Tamara Gibbs DURHAM (WTVD) -- Durham city leaders are set to review a controversial report that accuses its police force of raci...

The Battle for Police Oversight: Jeff Mitchell: Oversight board needed for Salinas ...

The Battle for Police Oversight: Jeff Mitchell: Oversight board needed for Salinas ...: On Tuesday I saw a fellow Salinan shot to death by police. The hard, no-compromises impact of the four or five bullets that slammed int...

Former Lyman police officer charged with misconduct in office set for trial



By Felicia Kitzmiller

Charges against former Lyman police officer Michael Hames will be decided at trial, according to his attorney.
During a status hearing Thursday, Hames' attorney Joshua Schwultz told Circuit Judge Roger Couch charges against Hames will proceed to trial. Hames is charged with misconduct in office and obstruction of justice and is accused of destroying evidence possibly related to an illegal dumping case.
“We're not sure when it will be, but we will continue to assert his innocence all through this process, and we look forward to trial,” Schultz said after the hearing.
According to warrants from the State Law Enforcement Division, between Aug. 12-16, Hames “knowingly, willfully and dishonestly” altered and then destroyed evidence in an active criminal investigation with the intent to interfere with the proper administration of justice.
Hames was arrested in January.
The case is being prosecuted by the S.C. Attorney General's Office.
The destruction of evidence happened days after Greer waste hauler Timothy Howard was given a hearing related to suspicions of illegal dumping. Hames responded to a call about Howard possibly dumping into the Lyman sewer system through a grease trap in a vacant Denny's parking lot on June 18, according to reports. The grease trap and several pieces of Howard's equipment later tested positive for PCBs, polychlorinated biphenyls, an illegal, cancer-causing substance that infected four Upstate sewer systems last summer and was also found in grease traps in Columbia and Charlotte, N.C.
The PCB outbreak sparked a state and federal investigation involving SLED, the FBI, S.C. Department of Health and Environmental Control and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. No charges have been filed in the PCB outbreak case, but Howard was charged with perjury and obstruction of justice in relation to statements he made during the investigation.
During a status hearing earlier this month, Howard's attorney said he expected his client's case to “work itself out to a plea,” but asked it be rescheduled because of an ongoing federal investigation. The assistant state attorney prosecuting the case told the judge if it could be rescheduled after July 1 it would not have to be delayed again.
Hames worked with the Lyman police department for 11 years and previously worked in fire service and with Spartanburg County EMS. After he was arrested, he was placed on administrative leave and officially terminated the day he was indicted by a grand jury on Feb. 21.
Hames' personnel file revealed theft charges leveled against him from a previous employer that were later withdrawn after Hames paid for the item, a $500 aircard bill that had to be repaid to Lyman, and accusations he allowed a DUI suspect to improperly leave a scene. Lyman Mayor Rodney Turner said the accusations were a result of “personality conflicts” and he found Hames to be a hardworking and trustworthy person.
Lyman Town Council unanimously decided in March to allow Hames, formerly a sergeant at the police department, to keep his K9.






“Call Flooding” For Police Reform





With change most likely to come on the heels of public demand so strong that it can’t be ignored, the public is encouraged to flood police departments with calls to end police brutality.

By Katie Rucke

Since the advent of social media, the public’s relationship with law enforcement has evolved into one in which the public can instantly call out abusive policing techniques and incidents in the hope that unlawful and inappropriate behavior can be stopped once and for all.
It may not be glaringly obvious, but the use of social media channels such as Twitter has been instrumental in garnering public support for reversing law enforcement’s military-esque and trigger-happy procedures that have become evident during several events throughout the years, such as the 2012 shootings in Anaheim, Calif., to the more recent shootings and calls for reform in Albuquerque, N.M.
While not every call for reform is answered or even acknowledged, many demanding widespread reform and an end to police brutality argue that posting concerns on social media and “call flooding” police departments are important steps in demonstrating to the law enforcement community that the American public will not tolerate abusive tactics. It also warns law enforcement that their abusive and unlawful practices are not going unnoticed.
For example, last month when the New York Police Department announced a Twitter campaign known as #myNYPD, asking New Yorkers to post presumably positive photos and interactions with officers, many police reform advocates used the campaign as an opportunity to showcase poor police tactics.
The pro-police campaign quickly turned into a PR nightmare for the department, as thousands of photos of NYPD officers demonstrating arguably brutal tactics such as beating restrained individuals, pulling the hair of a handcuffed woman, and shooting and killing innocent bystanders, flooded the Internet.
The way Internet users turned the campaign on its head was viewed as such a success that many police reform advocates took it as a chance to call out other departments for wrongful behavior. The Los Angeles Police Department, for example, got slammed under the hashtag #myLAPD.
Although the social media campaign didn’t go as planned, NYPD Police Commissioner Bill Bratton said he welcomed the bad photos, explaining that sometimes the work police officers do “isn’t pretty.”
However, Bratton didn’t have anyone post any of the “bad” photos on the department’s Facebook page, which is what officials decided to do with some of the “good” photos.
That’s the thing with social media — although thousands of people may have posted pictures of NYPD officers engaged in police brutality tactics, none are currently visible, since the police departments often delete posts that don’t paint them in the finest light.
Some are outraged to learn the police department actively deletes these negative posts, but some police reform advocates argue that deleting the posts is OK because someone at the department at least had to take the time to read the message and then delete it.
In other words, the message that it is time for a change was heard loud and clear, even if it was later deleted.
While not all Americans exercise their right to call a police department in order to report inappropriate behavior by officers, it’s completely legal to do so and is protected under the First Amendment — as is posting one’s grievances on social media channels.
But it’s important to remember that an individual is only protected so long as they remain calm. An angry tirade in which an individual mocks, condemns, accuses or judges officers is not protected, and it may result in an individual’s concerns not being taken seriously. A heated exchange with law enforcement that includes profanity and threats will also likely hurt other people’s attempts to reform law enforcement’s procedures and policies, as local police departments often report irate callers using abusive or profane language for harassment to other local law enforcement agencies and sometimes even the FBI.
Groups such as Cop Block, Honor Your Oath, the National Police Misconduct Reporting Project and Photography Is Not A Crime, have spent years educating the American public on a variety of police-related interactions — from what a driver should do if he or she is pulled over at a checkpoint, to what a citizen’s rights are when video and audio recording interactions with police officers.
Acting as a voice for the public, these groups have called directly for reform, but have also educated the public on why reform is necessary and how the public can participate. But like any other political issue, real reform likely won’t come until the public overwhelmingly demands change.Concerned about the emergence of a growing police state throughout the United States, groups are now calling for Americans to flood police departments with calls for police reform.
The public is asked to “call flood” not only law enforcement officials, but also local elected officials, such as mayors and city councils, local media outlets and even the local chamber of commerce, since as police reform advocate Mike Murphy wrote, “[I]f ever there’s a group sensitive to a community’s public image, it’s the local chamber of commerce.”




Former Boston commissioner Kathleen O'Toole nominated as Seattle's first female police chief



By GENE JOHNSON 

SEATTLE — Kathleen O'Toole, a one-time Boston police commissioner and former inspector general for Ireland's national police force, was nominated Monday as Seattle's first female police chief.
Seattle police have been under scrutiny for years, especially since an officer shot and killed a Native American woodcarver in 2010. In late 2011, the Justice Department found officers were too quick to use force, including using their batons and flashlights, even in situations that could have been defused verbally.
The findings rankled some of the department's top brass, but several of those figures have since left, and the department has been working to change under a settlement with federal authorities. It has adopted new policies on virtually everything officers do, including stops and detentions, using force, data collection and crisis intervention.
O'Toole laid out her general priorities during Monday's news conference: restoring public trust and department pride, focusing on crime and quality of life in each neighborhood, and running the department like a good business.
She also said she was encouraged by the amount of support within the community and among police officers and staff for the department to move beyond the federal monitoring.



City officer charged with criminal trespass



Chris Meyers

FORT WAYNE -- A Fort Wayne police officer is accused of breaking into a foreclosed home and taking a chain saw and gasoline cans from the property.
The officer was suspended and demoted in February but will not receive other administrative penalties if convicted, the city’s public safety director said.
Misdemeanor charges of criminal trespass and criminal conversion, filed Friday against Scott A. Criswell, 50, stem from an investigation that started in late 2013, according to a probable cause affidavit.
In August, Criswell was one of several Fort Wayne police officers who attended a gathering at another officer’s house near the foreclosed property, the report said.
A woman who along with her husband hosted the party told an Allen County detective that at some time during the evening she, Criswell and another woman went to the foreclosed home because Criswell was interested in buying it.
Once at the property, the three found some gas cans inside an open outbuilding. One of the women said Criswell placed the gas cans in the back of the ATV the group rode to the home, the affidavit said.
As the three walked around the house they found an unlocked, but chained, exterior basement door. One of the women told police she kicked the door open after Criswell could not get the chain off the door with a branch, according to the report.
The other woman told police the three were shocked the kick actually opened the door.
After the three made it into the home, Criswell went to an attached garage and returned with a chain saw in a case.
The incident came to light after it was reported internally in the Fort Wayne Police Department, said Rusty York, Fort Wayne’s director of public safety, who was still city police chief when the investigation started.
The affidavit also said a theft report was made from the property, but the connection between the person who reported the theft and the property was not provided.
“We contacted the Allen County Police Department and they conducted a lengthy investigation,” York said.
He said the police department gave Criswell a five-day suspension without pay in February as a result, and demoted him from a sergeant detective position to a uniformed patrol officer.
York said no further departmental penalties would be implemented, regardless of whether Criswell is convicted.



Detective Fired for Alleged Role in False Arrest



A Philadelphia area district attorney has fired a detective who allegedly filed baseless charges against a contractor, ruining his business.
The Philadelphia Inquirer reports that the Montgomery County district attorney fired detective Mary Anders this week. The move came as prosecutors reached a $1.6 million settlement with Walter Logan, a Radnor Township man who authorities now say was falsely charged with stealing from a Jenkintown church.
Logan says the theft charges all but destroyed reputation of his business. Logan's attorney says Anders never even interviewed him, instead building the case using information provided by the church.
A message left at a number listed for Mary Anders was not immediately returned.
Officials say Logan, a Radnor building contractor, was wrongly accused of ripping off Salem Baptist Church of Jenkintown. Last Tuesday he received an apology and $1.6 million as part of a lawsuit settlement.
The lawsuit states that Montgomery County District Attorney Risa Vetri Ferman brought unfounded theft charges against Logan.
Ferman apologized to Logan, whose alleged crimes she once called "particularly despicable" and "really very low."
The church had hired Logan's contracting company to build additions to its campus back in 2003. Several years later, that same church accused Logan of stealing from them.
"When Mr. Logan insisted on being paid he got a letter," said Mark Tanner, Logan's attorney. "The letter said, 'we are throwing you off this job.'"
The District Attorney's Office began to investigate Logan's work. In 2009, he was arrested and charged with swindling hundreds of thousands of dollars from the church.
"He was shocked," Tanner said. "He didn't do anything wrong."
An independent arbitrator later determined that it was the church who bilked Logan out of payment for his work. According to the arbitrator, the church actually owed Logan more than $300,000 in overdue fees and damages.




State law keeps officers’ disciplinary history secret



By Matthew Spina

In recent weeks, a Buffalo police officer was suspended for allegedly slapping around a defendant in handcuffs and then demanding an onlooker turn over cellphone video on the incident.
Two more officers were suspended without pay last week because they were present when a bar patron suffered serious brain injury at the bar where they were employed as security.
Police internal affairs investigators are investigating both cases.
But if internal discipline is ever meted out against those three officers, the public probably will never know. Nor will the public know if the department ever disciplined them in the past.
In short, the disciplinary history of any police officer in New York is cloaked in secrecy.
Unlike most other types of public employees, a record of disciplinary actions taken against a police officer cannot be unearthed by a request for records under the state’s Freedom of Information Law.
Since the mid-1970s, New York Civil Right Law has kept confidential the records used “to evaluate performance toward continued employment or promotion” for police officers. The law has even been expanded over the years to protect corrections officers and professional firefighters.
Because of Civil Rights Law Section 50-a, only a court order or the employees themselves can unlock the records for public inspection.
“The result of Section 50-a is that those government employees who have the most power over our lives are the least accountable,” said Robert J. Freeman, executive director of the New York Committee on Open Government.
Keeping the disciplinary records secret was intended to protect officers from being embarrassed or harassed when they testified in court about unrelated arrests. But Freeman said that is a hollow argument because judges control the courtroom, and a judge can tell a lawyer that such questions are out of bounds if they are in fact out of bounds.
Freeman contends that once an officer or corrections officer retires or resigns, their personnel records can become public because the employee is no longer eligible for “continued employment or promotion.” Some appeals court judges have agreed with that argument in specific requests for records under the Freedom of Information Law.
Since the mid-1970s, New York Civil Right Law has kept confidential the records used “to evaluate performance toward continued employment or promotion” for police officers. The law has even been expanded over the years to protect corrections officers and professional firefighters.
Because of Civil Rights Law Section 50-a, only a court order or the employees themselves can unlock the records for public inspection.
“The result of Section 50-a is that those government employees who have the most power over our lives are the least accountable,” said Robert J. Freeman, executive director of the New York Committee on Open Government.
Keeping the disciplinary records secret was intended to protect officers from being embarrassed or harassed when they testified in court about unrelated arrests. But Freeman said that is a hollow argument because judges control the courtroom, and a judge can tell a lawyer that such questions are out of bounds if they are in fact out of bounds.
Freeman contends that once an officer or corrections officer retires or resigns, their personnel records can become public because the employee is no longer eligible for “continued employment or promotion.” Some appeals court judges have agreed with that argument in specific requests for records under the Freedom of Information Law.






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More drunk and drugged up cops...ever wonder who the real crime problem in America is?



Former Miami Beach officer faces trial in DUI, reckless driving charges in '11 ATV crash

MIAMI — Jury selection is set to begin for a former Miami Beach police officer charged with four felonies stemming from a 2011 beach crash in which his all-terrain vehicle seriously injured two people.
Potential jurors will be questioned beginning Tuesday in Miami-Dade Circuit Court in the case of Derek Kuilan. Prosecutors say he was joy-riding with a woman on the ATV after drinking while on duty at a bachelorette party at a South Beach nightclub.
A man and a woman walking on the beach to see the sunrise were seriously injured when struck by Kuilan's ATV. Kuilan is charged with two counts of driving under the influence with serious bodily injury and two counts of reckless driving with bodily injury.

Each charge carries a potential five-year prison sentence.




Man claims officer struck his car, then placed him under arrest

MILWAUKEE —A man claims a Milwaukee police officer struck his car and then placed him under arrest for drunken driving.
Diego Rodriguez-Hernandez was near Second Street and National Avenue in August 2013 around bar time. That's when he said a Milwaukee police sergeant backed up and struck his car.
"This thing came apart," he said, showing WISN 12 News the tail light on his car. "We replaced it cause it break."
But instead of discussing the accident, Rodriguez said he was placed under arrest.
"He's like, 'You been drinking tonight?'" Rodriguez said. "He put the handcuffs on me and he throw me in the police car."
Cameras inside the police squad captured some of the conversation.
"This is not fair," he told the officer. "You were backing up fast. I stopped. You hit me."
The police sergeant saw the incident a different way.
"You're still drunk," the officer said. "You ain't got no license. That means you ain't supposed to be on the road. If you weren't on the road you wouldn't have gotten hit, would you?"
Rodriguez was born with a deformity that left him with one finger on each hand. Because of that deformity, he said the handcuffs slipped off while he was in the squad car.
"He thought I was trying to escape," he said.
"Here are your handcuffs, I don't need them," Rodriguez told the officer. "My hands are too small. They don't fit in here."
And that's when the arrest became physical.
"Get on the ground! Get on the ground!" Sgt. Thomas Johnson yelled as he forcefully removed Rodriguez from the squad car.
"He opened up the door of the police car, grabbed me from my shirt, throw me on the ground," Rodriguez said. "I told him the whole time I cannot have handcuffs. He don't listen to me."
Police procedures state that supervisors much report such a use of force. Johnson did not. Instead, he placed Rodriguez under arrest for drunken driving.
WISN 12 News obtained police reports that show at least four other officers on scene said Rodriguez did not appear drunk. Documents show that an officer who conducted a field sobriety test showed that he passed.
Rodriguez filed a complaint against Johnson. James Graf, who witnessed the original incident, also called police about it.
"This cop car backed into the car and all of a sudden just arrested him," Graf said. "It was ridiculous."
WISN 12 News reporter Colleen Henry went to Johnson's home, but he declined to comment. However Henry has obtained a statement Johnson gave to officers who invested the complaint against him. In the statement, Johnson denied arresting Rodriguez to minimize the crash.
Regarding the handcuffs, Johnson said in the statement "Because he doesn't have hands doesn't mean he can't hurt you. It's a very minor property damage accident with an intoxicated driver who happens to be handicapped. That's not my fault. He shouldn't have been there. I didn't do anything wrong. I'm sick of it, climbing up my (expletive) for it."
Johnson was demoted from sergeant to officer, and is working in the evidence room while he appeals his demotion.
Rodriguez said he was not even aware of Johnson's demotion or the investigation of the incident.
"If you make a mistake, you got to face it," Rodriguez said. "He did not fix it. He also gave me a ticket."
Milwaukee police did not rescind the drunken driving ticket. However, it was reduced to reckless driving, which Rodriguez did plead guilty to. He said he is making monthly payments to fulfill that ticket.
Milwaukee police officials said they will not comment on the case until the appeal process has concluded. The findings are expected to be released at the end of July.




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Photograph the Police: 7 rules when recording the police

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The new warrant


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Yet another drunk cop


Port Chester cop charged with drunken driving in crash
Will David
HARRISON – An off-duty Port Chester police officer was arrested, accused of drunken-driving Wednesday morning after a three-vehicle accident on Interstate 287 in Harrison, state police said.
Jose A. Nieves, 40, an eight-year Port Chester police veteran, was turned over to his own department after being booked by state troopers at the Thruway barracks.
Trooper Jason Jones, a spokesman for Troop T, said the accident happened around 2 a.m. Wednesday. Nieves was driving west when he rear-ended a parked construction vehicle that was apparently unoccupied. Nieves' vehicle was then rear-ended by a Big Apple Taxi cab.
Emergency medical personnel and state troopers were on the scene. The cabdriver and Nieves refused medical attention, Jones said.
A chemical test showed that his blood-alcohol content was 0.13 percent, more than 1.5 times the legal limit, police said.
Nieves is charged with misdemeanor driving while intoxicated and issued an appearance ticket. He is due back in Harrison Town Court at 9:30 a.m. June 3.
Port Chester police Lt. James Ladeairous said the department had no comment on the incident, referring questions to state police.
Nieves remains on the department's payroll and his job status remains unchanged at this point, Ladeairous said.
Staff writer Hoa Nguyen contributed to this report



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Suspended Hobart cop avoids trial



By Ruth Ann Krause

A Hobart police officer charged last year with financial fraud, theft and official misconduct in two separate incidents has entered into a pre-trial agreement with Lake County prosecutors that could avoid a criminal conviction.
A misdemeanor charge of conversion was filed Wednesday against Officer Kirk Homoky, and the felony charges filed in the two cases were dismissed.
If Homoky has no other criminal charges filed against him for one year, the cases will be dismissed, according to the agreement. Superior Court Magistrate Kathleen Sullivan scheduled a May 21, 2015 hearing for disposition of the cases.
Under the agreement, Homoky paid $492 in restitution to a business that overpaid him by mistake for off-duty security work.
In March 2013, Homoky was placed on unpaid leave from the police department after he was accused of keeping the overpayment and of taking a $20 bill from a car that was stopped by police in September 2010.
City attorney Anthony DeBonis said it’s unclear what the city will do regarding Homoky’s status with the police department if the cases against him are dismissed after one year.
Meanwhile, Homoky’s federal lawsuit against the city, filed in November 2012, is pending. He contends the police department violated his rights when he was suspended without pay and the former chief tried to fire him.





Send em home on a paid vacation, that'll teach him.


Haines City police sergeant suspended with pay
HAINES CITY --
A Haines City police officer has been suspended with pay pending the outcome of an internal affairs investigation, City Manager Jonathan Evans told The Ledger of Lakeland.
Sgt. Heriberto "Herb" Hernandez was actually suspended last Thursday, three weeks after the start of the police department's investigation.
Police and city officials have not discussed the reason for the investigation, which also is looking at Sgts. Ron Brown and Mick Harrison, Lt. Keith Hammond and Cpl. Shawn Mobre, Chief Rick Sloan told The Ledger.

Hernandez started as a patrol officer in May 2005 and has been promoted four times. He earns $46,585 per year